Monthly Archives: February 2016

Books: Getting details on Longboarding

Posted on 20 February, 2016 in boards

You are thinking about buying a longboard or wanted to get to know the sport for ages, but first want to read about it so you know what it is and what it involves.

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There is plenty of information online. From articles, to pictures, from quotes to guides. You name it, but it is all over the place. You have to find it.

Finding a book about longboards is a little bit tricky. When you search about longboard books, you will come across surfboard. This is not the same. We are looking for street longboarding.

Since the sport is pretty young, it is not easy to find books about it. You will also find mix ups between longboarding and skateboarding since it is very close to each other.

They both have trucks, wheels and a deck. You can do as many tricks on a longboard as a skateboard when you have the right size. With longboarding you can do actually more then skateboarding. You can cruise, learn tricks (yes, you can do this with a longboard too. They come in small sizes too) and go long distance on a longboard. The last one you do not do with a skateboard.

Your local library might have some books also. You don’t have to spend a lot of money purchasing books. These books you will find a large amount of information and studying the latest longboard tips.

Of course, if you want to relate to the books frequently, you might want to buy them and put them in your longboard collection.

We found a books that might inspire you about David Cornthwaite
BoardFree: The Story of an Incredible Skateboard Journey across Australia

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As Featured in the Guinness Book of Records, this is the thrilling, inspiring story of Dave Cornthwaite’s epic journey in Australia by a most unusual form of transport. Tired of the nine-to-five, Dave decided one day that he needed a change a big change. And so he jumped on his RollsRolls longboard (the Land Rover of skateboards) and broke a world record, skating the length of Great Britain a distance of 4,500 miles – raising money for three children’s charities in the process and earning a reputation as a mad man.